Program Structure

The Literature and Creative Writing major fosters students’ skills as interpreters of literature and as analysts of culture, history, and politics. Creative writing seminars — open to the entire NYUAD student body — include instruction in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, literary journalism, and writing for stage and screen. Students who major in Literature and Creative writing must complete 12 courses and pursue one of two tracks: Literary Scholarship or Creative Writing.

Though most course materials are written in or translated into English, they are drawn from an array of cultural traditions. Students with fluency in other languages are encouraged to read assigned texts in the original. All majors take at least one course in creative writing; In advanced coursework, students may pursue a specialization in either literary studies or creative writing, culminating in a Capstone thesis or creative project.

Capstone Project

The Capstone Project is a graduate requirement aimed at creating a significant piece of research and/or creative work. In Literature and Creative Writing, this can take the form of a thesis project: for example, an analysis and discussion, participation within an ongoing theoretical debate, or creative composition. The Capstone experience culminates in the public presentation of the student project during the Capstone festival and a Capstone defense.

Literature Capstone

The Capstone Project in Literature represents the culmination of a student's work as a Literature major. It is a substantial work of written scholarship that enables a student to explore and make a scholarly contribution to areas of particular personal interest. Students are expected to work on the Capstone project throughout the senior year and, ideally, to conduct research during the previous summer. The final project should be a polished and professional example of scholarly research and writing at its best.

Creative Writing Capstone

The Capstone Project in Creative Writing draws on the work that students have done both in Creative Writing workshops and courses in Literature. These projects may take the form of a novel; a collection of short stories, poems, or personal essays; a play; a screenplay; or a similarly substantial creative endeavor. Students are expected to work on the Capstone project throughout the senior year and, if necessary, to conduct research during the previous summer.