Center for Prototype Climate Modeling

CPCM is an interdisciplinary research unit at New York University Abu Dhabi, generously supported by the NYU Abu Dhabi Research Institute.

Our mission is to bridge the gap between climate theory, modeling, and observation, with the goal of better understanding fundamental processes in the earth system, and improving our ability to predict future climate.

Core Research Areas

  • Regional climate modeling for the Arabian Peninsula and South Asia, led by Co-PI, Olivier Pauluis
  • The biogeochemistry of the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean, led by Co-PI, Shafer Smith
  • Prediction of Low Frequency Variations of South Asian Monsoon using Nonlinear Models, led by PI Andrew Majda

Read more about our research here.

Core Activities

  • The development of new methods, including parameterizations, diagnostics, and low-order predictive models;
  • the application of these methods to critical problems in the dynamics of the tropical and subtropical atmosphere and ocean;
  • and the modeling the interaction of biogeochemical cycles and climate.

    The current atomospheric conditions over the Middle East

Featured News

  • July 17, 2018:  Expanding ‘dead zone’ in Arabian Sea raises climate change fears, Arabian Business | Yahoo News | France 24 | Gulf News
  • April 28, 2018:  How NYUAD research hopes to predict crucial changes to India’s monsoons, The National 
  • February 28, 2018:  Rain alert on rising temperatures, Telegraph India
  • February 27, 2018:  Simulations suggest changes in weather patterns coming to India due to global warming, Phys.org
  • February 26, 2018:  Northern India may get extreme rainfall in future, Nature Asia
A snapshot of simulated surface chlorophyll-a (top left), sea surface temperature (top right), sea surface height (bottom left) and mixing layer depth (bottom right) in August. The results are based on a 5km eddy resolving version of the ROMS model. Highly energetic mesoscale eddies and filaments dominate the circulation and modulate the biological production in the Arabian Sea.
A snapshot of simulated surface chlorophyll-a (top left), sea surface temperature (top right), sea surface height (bottom left) and mixing layer depth (bottom right) in August. The results are based on a 5km eddy resolving version of the ROMS model. Highly energetic mesoscale eddies and filaments dominate the circulation and modulate the biological production in the Arabian Sea.
A snapshot of simulated chlorophyll-a, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), oxygen and vertical velocity in the upper 400m along a transect crossing the Arabian Sea from east to west (15N) in August. The strong vertical velocities (bottom) in the western Arabian Sea are associated with large supply of nutrients to the surface and high surface chlorophyll concentrations. In the eastern Arabian Sea, the weak vertical velocities coincide with oxygen depleted waters at depth.
A snapshot of simulated chlorophyll-a, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), oxygen and vertical velocity in the upper 400m along a transect crossing the Arabian Sea from east to west (15N) in August. The strong vertical velocities (bottom) in the western Arabian Sea are associated with large supply of nutrients to the surface and high surface chlorophyll concentrations. In the eastern Arabian Sea, the weak vertical velocities coincide with oxygen depleted waters at depth.

Awards

UAE Rainfall Enhancement Project

A major sub-award from UAE Rainfall Enhancement Project was awarded earlier this year to Co-PI Olivier Pauluis and Dr. Ajaya Ravinran to study cloud microphysical aspects of cloud seeding projects over UAE.  The sub-project titled “Using Advanced Experimental – Numerical Approaches to Untangle Rain Enhancement (UAE-NATURE)” is a one of multiple projects and Professor Pauluis is will work with PI Dr. Lulin Xue, of the Hua Xin Chuang Zhi Science and Technology LLC in China on it.  The award (part of a $5 million-dollar grant shared with two other projects) was announced at the Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week at ADNEC on January 17th, 2018.

Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IIT-M) – Monsoon Mission 

Monsoon Mission Grant of more than $500,000 USD was awarded to PI Andrew Majda and Dr. Ajaya Ravindran for their work on “A novel approach for improving rain-gauge data assimilation and extended range prediction of sub-seasonal variability over India.”  The three year award from the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology is a collaboration with Dimitris Giannakis from Courant Institute of Mathematical Science, NYUNY and a selected number of scientists based in India.  Their joint research between 2015 to now focuses on developing the world’s best coarse resolution operational model to predict monsoon and MJO.

Contact Us

Abu Dhabi Office
Computational and Research Building (A2)
Level 1
New York University Abu Dhabi
Saadiyat Island
PO Box 129188, Abu Dhabi, UAE
cpcm.nyuad@nyu.edu

New York Office
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU
Warren Weaver Hall
251 Mercer Street,
New York, NY, 10012, US


Bianca Arkeen
Computational and Research Building (A2) 1122C
New York University Abu Dhabi
+971 2 628 5333
bianca.arkeen@nyu.edu