In the News

NYUAD Featured Articles

Bright Hot Crystals

NYUAD researchers achieve solid state Thermochemiluminescence with crystals that emit light when heated.

Breakthrough Crystal That Can Self-Repair Overnight

Imagine a future where buildings and roads can self-repair cracks; cogs installed deep inside complex machines can independently heal structural wear and tear; smartphones can automatically mend their broken screens; all without human intervention.

In the News

Learning from Nature: Advanced Biomimetic Materials
Over the course of millennia, plants and animals have developed and perfected mechanisms for motion, survival, and dispersal with astounding grace, speed, and versatility. As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Panče Naumov RI '19 investigates how do they do it and asks, What can we learn from them?
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study | April 11, 2019

UAE Researcher Joins Quest for Heat-Resistant Vaccines
Marieh al-Handawi, a chemist at New York University–Abu Dhabi, is developing vaccines to withstand temperature changes during shipping.
Al-Fanar Media | April 08, 2019

Researchers achieve solid state thermochemiluminescence with crystals
The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, demonstrate that this fundamental process of transduction of energy—heat, applied to a material, generates light—can be achieved in pure solid materials of millimeter or centimeter size.
Phys.org | March 01, 2019

Inkless pen to protect secret documents
Researchers have prepared a light-emitting organic material that can be used to print patterns, write documents and even encode secret codes on a filter paper using just sunlight.
Nature India | August 31, 2018

Could a UAE plant hold the key to developing a low-cost blindness treatment?
NYUAD graduate Yumi Gambrill spent a year working to identify a chemical with anti-cataract properties found in a plant called Cleome rupicola.
The National | July 07, 2018  

Going through a phase
Chemists are finding fascinating phase-change phenomena that make crystals jump and pop.
‘It started as a curiosity,’ recalls Pance Naumov, now an associate professor at NYU Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. ’One of my postdocs came to me and said: “I can’t get hold of my crystals, they are escaping!”’
Chemistry World | November 10, 2017

ACIE: press release on work from the Naumov Group entitled “Raucous Crystals.”
Some organic crystals jump around when heated up. This happens because of an extremely fast change in their crystal structure. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now demonstrated that the crystals send out acoustic signals during this process, which may be useful in analyzing the characteristics of this phenomenon. The researchers demonstrated that this process is analogous to martensitic transitions observed in steel and some alloys.
Wiley  |  June 16, 2017

Desy: Jumping crystals produce sound waves
Organic crystals behave like steel.
Desy  |  June 14, 2017

Panče Naumov and colleagues were recognized for their work on firefly bioluminescence by the Human Frontier Science Program
The different color of bioluminescent light emitted by different organisms has inspired several decades of inconclusive research efforts and debates on its mechanism and the underlying photochemistry. Now, mathematical analysis of the spectra of firefly oxyluciferin, the emitting molecule in fireflies embedded in the bioluminescent enzyme luciferase, has for the first time provided direct insight into the mechanistic complexity of this natural system for generation of cold light.
HFSP  |  February 14, 2017

Follow

Twitter