At the Interface of Mathematics and Physics

    by Brian Kappler
    Camia-salaam

    In the higher reaches of physics, says Federico Camia, the border with mathematics has become remarkably porous. And he is living proof of that: holder of a Ph.D. in physics from NYU New York, he is today a visiting associate professor of Mathematics at NYU Abu Dhabi.

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    Welcome, Class of 2018!

    by Sallie Isobel Moffat

    A very warm welcome to the Class of 2018! And what better way to get you started here at NYU Abu Dhabi than with advice from those who have already walked the path on which you are about to embark? Without further ado, some words of wisdom from members of the University's inaugural Class of 2014.

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    Virtualization of Touch

    by Brian Kappler
    Virtualization of Touch-salaam

    Mohamed Eid lights up with enthusiasm as he expounds on the future of "tangible interfaces." No wonder: from computer gaming to wheelchair control, his work promises to expand users' computer experiences beyond the keyboard and screen, beyond just sight and sound, to touch, gesture, and more.

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    A Capital Summer

    by Austin Wilson
    yoyoma

    Guest Post: Austin Wilson, NYUAD Class of 2015.

    What do six members of the United States Senate, world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and an NYU Abu Dhabi student have in common? Many of you may believe this to be the start of a terrible joke, but the truth is that these are three components, albeit unlikely ones, of my summer internship experience in the capital of the United States — the picturesque city of Washington, D.C.

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    Designing Compounds to Target Cancer

    by Farah Shamma
    Designing Compounds to Target Cancer

    Shahienaz Hampton, a postdoctoral associate in the Dore Lab at NYU Abu Dhabi, is part of a team investigating Ras proteins, which function as molecular switches and are involved in transmitting signals within cells. When Ras is switched on, this subsequently turns on genes involved in cellular processes including cell growth and cell proliferation. Consequently, mutations in Ras genes, also known as oncogenes, result in the production of overactive Ras that may ultimately lead to cancer. As such, oncogenic Ras is implicated in and accounts for approximately 20 percent to 30 percent of human cancers, primarily pancreatic and colon cancers.

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