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Fiona Kidd, Assistant Professor of History and Art and Art History, Arts and Humanities, NYUAD

Fiona Kidd

Assistant Professor of History and Art and Art History, Arts and Humanities

Affiliation: NYU Abu Dhabi

Biography

B.A. (Hons) University of Melbourne; Ph.D. University of Sydney

Fiona Kidd is an archaeologist with 13 years of excavation experience in the Near East and Central Asia, predominantly Uzbekistan.  As a member of the Karakalpak-Australian Archaeological Expedition she excavated and continues to publish a major corpus of Central Asian wall paintings dated to the first century BCE – including a gallery of life-sized portraits – from the site of Akchakhan-kala in Khorezm.

Fiona combines research interests in identity, images and the built environment, craft production, and exchange with specializations in pre-Islamic Central Asian visual art. She is particularly interested in the interactions between mobile, agricultural, and herder populations, which have shaped Central Asia over millennia.  

She is preparing a book in which she applies a deep time approach to the Khorezmian oasis, in order to understand late first millennium BCE exchange as part of a much broader pattern of interactions. She is establishing a collaborative fieldwork project in Uzbekistan, with the first season due to take place in June 2015.  

Before joining NYUAD Fiona was an assistant curator in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2012-2014), a Visiting Research Scholar at ISAW/NYU (2011-12), and an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sydney (2008-2011).

Courses

  • Archaeology of the Near East from the Origins of Agriculture to Alexander the Great (AW-UH 1111)

  • Alexander and the East: Central Asia and the Mediterranean from the Achaemenid Period to the Early Medieval Period (6th Century BCE - 8th Century CE) (AW-UH 1113X)

  • Silk Roads Past and Present (HIST-UH 1120)

  • Identity and Object (CCEA-UH 1004)